PRESS RELEASE: HELPING HANDS FUND SUPPORTS TITLE AGENTS

LONGMONT, Colo. – Alliant National Title Insurance Company is encouraging its title agents impacted by hurricanes Harvey and Irma to apply for financial relief through the Alliant National Title Helping Hands Fund.

“We are praying for everyone impacted by these recent catastrophes and want to help in any way we can,” Bob Grubb, Alliant National Title Insurance Company president and CEO said. “Our people have been in touch with many title agents who’ve been directly impacted by the storm, asking how we can be helpful to them, their employees and their communities at this time – whether that’s sending support staff to their offices, delivering water or even a simple sandwich platter – we are trying to help with anything they might need.”

The fund is a charity vehicle created through a partnership with the Greater Houston Community Foundation. Through GHCF, a full 95 percent of donations will go directly to those who meet the criteria for assistance.

Assistance will help cover costs and expenses not already covered by insurance or other means of damage recoupment, Grubb said.

Alliant National’s title agents and their employees – as well as its own employees – are eligible to apply for relief if living in or operating their business in a county declared a federal disaster area due to Harvey or Irma.

The Helping Hands Fund was set up in the wake of Hurricane Harvey by a team of Alliant National employees led by Rodney Anderson, Senior Vice President and Southwestern Regional Agency Manager. The scope of relief efforts were extended to include Florida as Hurricane Irma churned in the Atlantic Ocean, with its eye set on the panhandle.

“It is an honor to be a part of an organization that operates with such heart and compassion,” Anderson said. “We hope that these efforts as well as the donations collected through our Alliant National Title Helping Hands Fund are able to provide some relief during this difficult time.”

Anyone may donate to the Helping Hands Fund, and donations are tax deductible. For more information and to make a donation, visit ghcfdisaster.kimbia.com/alliantnationaltitlerelief.

In addition, Alliant National donated to Samaritan’s Purse’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund and Global Giving Foundation’s Hurricane Irma Relief Fund.

Samaritan’s Purse helps to meet the “needs of people who are victims of war, poverty, natural disasters, disease, and famine,” according to its website, while the Global Giving Foundation’s Irma Fund, will provide relief to survivors, “in the form of emergency supplies like food, water, and medicine in addition to longer-term recovery assistance to help residents recover and rebuild,” according to its website.

“When agents are in need of assistance from such deadly, natural disasters it is a privilege to create a formal giving platform that can truly make an impact for those responsible for our success,” Anderson said.

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FACEBOOK COVER ART: IDEAL DIMENSIONS FOR MOBILE, DESKTOP?

At the very top of your title agency’s Facebook Page is an image known as cover art. Designing a graphic that renders nicely on mobile apps as well as desktop browsers can be an art unto itself.

That’s because the dimensions for cover art on a mobile app versus a desktop browser vary slightly. Cover art, “displays at 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall on your Page on computers and 640 pixels wide by 360 pixels tall on smartphones,” according to Facebook.

In years past it may have been easy enough to design your title agency’s Facebook cover art with only desktop browsers in mind.

However, digital marketing firm Zephoria reports the number of mobile daily active users has surged in the past two years to 1.15 billion of the platform’s total 2.01 billion monthly active users (as of June 2017).

That means about half of Facebook users engage with the social media network almost exclusively on their mobile devices.

Your title agency’s Facebook Page can only use one cover art image at a time. And being at the top of the Page, your Facebook cover art is your first (possibly only) chance to make a strong impression with would-be clientele.

So how do you design Facebook cover art that will allow you to put your best foot forward no matter if the user visits your page from a mobile app or desktop browser?

Like so many things in life, the answer is compromise. Through our own research plus a bit of trial-and-error, we have determined the ideal dimensions for a Facebook cover art image are 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall.

At these dimensions, placing your cover art for desktop should be relatively straight forward – what you see is what you get. The mobile cover art will require a bit more consideration as you design. When working with a Facebook cover art image sized at 820-by-462 pixels, it’s important to keep in mind that the very top and very bottom of the graphic, 75 pixels on either side, will not appear when a visitor views your Facebook Page on a mobile app.

Do not place pertinent information, such as a company logo or a phone number, in these regions. Furthermore, do not arrange your image in such a way that it will be cut off in an awkward way.

To help our title agents design attractive and professional Facebook cover art for their pages, we’ve created a series of free Facebook templates for download.

WATCH: ALLIANT NATIONAL RECOGNIZED AMONG TOP COLORADO-BASED REAL ESTATE COMPANIES

Bob Grubb, who is president and CEO of Alliant National Title Insurance Company speaks to Colorado Biz Magazine about launching a title insurance underwriter and then finding a way to grow despite a financial crisis that dissolved 45 percent of the industry.

The magazine was recognizing Top Real Estate Companies in Colorado, and Alliant National was a finalist for the award. The prize went to DPC Development Companies, while 8Z Real Estate was also recognized as a runner-up.

WIRE FRAUD: WHAT IS THE BUSINESS EMAIL COMPROMISE?

Wire fraud attempts are very common in the title industry. A typical wire fraud scheme, encountered by some of our agents, is known as a business email compromise (“BEC”). In this scheme, the fraudster has hacked into a party’s email account.

The fraudster then lies in wait, they read the outgoing and incoming emails waiting for a sales transaction to occur.

Missouri: Practical, useful benefits of correction deeds

Once a deed is recorded, it becomes part of the public record and cannot be changed. However, sometimes an error in the recorded deed is discovered by one of the parties.

Typical errors include misspelled or incomplete names, omission of a party’s marital status, or an incorrect or incomplete legal description of the property which is the subject of the deed. In such cases, the Trenton K. Bond public record can be amended by recording a correction deed.