LATEST PRESS RELEASES

Media Contact

Cathie Beck
Capital City Public Relations
e : cathie@capitalcitypr.com
p : 303-241-0805

THE COMPASS DISPATCH: LATEST FROM OUR BLOG

  • Claims Stories: A Naked Release Should Trigger a Red Flag

    Claims Stories: A Naked Release Should Trigger a Red Flag

    In our continued effort to keep our agents and escrow officers apprised of trends in the title industry, our claims counsels and administrators have provided the following claim summaries. It is our goal to share these stories and help you avoid similar scenarios in the future.

    In this story we describe a scenario where a naked release was used by a couple in an attempt to defraud a title agent.

    A naked release is a release of a lien or mortgage that is not done in connection with a sale or refinance transaction. These releases are a red flag and merit further investigation. Naked releases often involve forgery which are expensive to resolve and cause significant losses.

    Here’s how it played out:

    Annie conveys to Billy and his Wife Sally in 2015. Billy and Sally take out a $1.5 million dollar purchase money mortgage. In 2016, a release (satisfaction) is recorded. There were no refinances or sales of record.

    Billy and Sally send the title agent a contract to sell the property. In this scenario the release was a naked release, and it was forged by Billy and Sally.

    The title agent commented that Billy and Sally appeared to be very wealthy and credible. While in rare instances borrowers will pay off their loan prior to the sale, it is not common. If you see a naked release of record, contact the bank that released the mortgage for the payoff.

    If the borrowers do not want to give you authorization to contact their bank, stop the transaction and contact Underwriting.

    For more information, please see Alliant National Underwriting Bulletin # 15-01.

    Go to Blog

  • Third party independently validates our rigorous standards, processes with SSAE 18 Certification

    Third party independently validates our rigorous standards, processes with SSAE 18 Certification

    Alliant National’s Agent Verification Process Achieves SSAE 18 Certification

    Fourth consecutive year of compliance certification independently validates underwriter’s rigorous standards and procedures

    LONGMONT, Colo. – The nation’s largest title insurance underwriter with no direct or affiliate operations today announced its successful completion of the Service Organization Control (SOC 1) Statements on Standards for Attestation Engagements 18 (SSAE 18) Type II examination. The certification, endorsed by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), means Alliant National has maintained effective controls over its Agent Quality Management System.

    The successful SSAE 18 Type II examination independently validates Alliant National’s rigorous standards and processes for approving, monitoring and reviewing its independent agents, which results in its agents being designated as Authorized Service Providers or Certified Service Providers of Alliant National.

    “Alliant National was the first title insurance underwriter in the nation to obtain an SSAE18 Type II compliant status and is the only title insurance underwriter to achieve compliant status for four consecutive years,” said David Sinclair, Alliant National’s chief operating officer. “This certification provides unmatched independent assurance of our agent oversight systems to lenders and all stakeholders.”


    MEDIA INQUIRIES

    Cathie Beck
    Capital City Public Relations
    e : cathie@capitalcitypr.com
    p : 303-241-0805


    Alliant National is an industry pioneer that distinguishes itself from competitors by putting the interests of agents first. Bolstered by financial stability, strong underwriting capability and independent agents’ in-depth knowledge of local markets, the company has established a nationwide network with deep roots in local communities and a wealth of expertise that is flexible, nuanced and continuously growing.

    Alliant National is the largest title insurance underwriter in the country with no direct operations to compete against its agents, with agents holding more than 50 percent of ownership in the company. Alliant National’s CEO, Bob Grubb, can be reached at 303.682.9800 x300 or bgrubb@alliantnational.com.

    About Alliant National

    Alliant National is an industry pioneer that distinguishes itself from competitors by putting the interests of Independent Agents first. Bolstered by financial stability, strong underwriting capability and Independent Agents’ in-depth knowledge of local markets, the company has established a nationwide network with deep roots in local communities and a wealth of expertise that is flexible, nuanced and continuously growing.

    Alliant National’s CEO, Bob Grubb, can be reached at 303.682.9800 x300 or bgrubb@alliantnational.com.

    Visit joinalliantnational.com for additional information.

    About Alliant National Title Insurance Company

    The Independent Underwriter for The Independent Agent® Alliant National believes in putting other people first. The company partners with 400+ trusted independent title agents as a licensed underwriter in 22 states, with annual revenues exceeding $120 million, and protects the dreams of property owners with secure title insurance.

    Go to Blog

  • When in Doubt, Shout it Out:  Disclosure of Defects in Residential Resales

    When in Doubt, Shout it Out: Disclosure of Defects in Residential Resales

    How many times have you looked around your home and thought, “Wow, that stain on the ceiling is huge. I need to fix that water leak.”

    How about, “I’m so glad those termites haven’t come back.” Or, have you moved that potted plant to cover the water stain that seeped up through the hardwood floor?

    While these are things we’ve probably all done or thought at one point or another, these instances can have big effects if not properly disclosed during the sale of your home.

    Even something as minuscule as a bump in the floor can signify a larger structural issue and cause you a massive headache months or years after the sale of your property. Sometimes there can be confusion about which defects warrant disclosure.

    In Florida, disclosure is required for all known material defects affecting the value of the property.
    Luckily, a “material defect” is fairly easy to spot—they are those visible to the eye. Given this broad definition, any material defects known to the seller must be disclosed to the buyer (for example, that annoying water leak in the ceiling).

    Of course, these issues are not surprises to most potential buyers because they are visible to the eye. Even so, sellers should tell the truth when asked about visible material defects because lying about, or minimizing the extent of, a defect, can open the seller to liability for nondisclosure in the future.

    Aside from material defects visible to the eye, sellers also have to disclose the existence of non-apparent defects (like that water stain under the plant).

    Remember, any defect affecting the value of the property needs to be disclosed to potential buyers. Also, be sure to avoid withholding information from buyers when responding to questions about potential defects.

    Even if you had your home treated for termites last year, and have had no active infestations since, you must still disclose the existence of the prior termite issue to avoid being saddled with liability down the road.

    There are, however, certain classes of defects deemed nonmaterial by statute, even though their existence can have a major impact on the perceived value of the property.

    Under Florida law, whether the property was the actual site, or even a suspected site, of a homicide, suicide, or death, it need not be disclosed to potential buyers.

    The Charles Mansons of the world can relax since they won’t have to confess their gory misdeeds to potential buyers – they just shouldn’t expect the court of public opinion to be so kind. Also included in the nonmaterial-by-statute category is whether someone living in the property is infected with AIDS.

    In sum, it is important to accurately and completely disclose to all potential buyers any defects visible to others, and those secret gems hidden under pots, rugs, and couches.

    Most defects can be cured during the inspection period outlined in the purchase contract and will not derail a closing. Plus, it is better to sell your home without the specter of a future lawsuit looming over your head. (And as for specters, ghouls, and goblins – their existence does not have to be disclosed either, at least under a strict reading of Florida law.)

    When in doubt, a good rule to live by is disclose, disclose, disclose.

    The law regarding identification and disclosure of defects can be confusing, especially when it comes to those that appear to be mainly cosmetic in nature. The advice of a knowledgeable attorney can help you navigate the law regarding disclosure issues.

    Go to Blog

  • Claims Stories: Be Skeptical of a Recently Recorded Quit Claim Deed

    Claims Stories: Be Skeptical of a Recently Recorded Quit Claim Deed

    In our continued effort to keep our agents and escrow officers apprised of trends in the title industry, our claims counsels and administrators have shared the following claim story. It is our goal to share these stories and help you avoid similar scenarios in the future.

    In this story we describe a scenario involving a Quit Claim Deed and an attempt to defraud a title agent. Here’s how it played out:

    The agent received a contract from a seller for a closing. The deed into the seller was executed in 2010 and recorded in 2017. A title claim was received when the rightful heirs of the grantor on the deed came forward and alleged the grantor had died in 2017. The deed had been backdated to a date prior to the grantor’s death.

    The Quit Claim Deed continues to be a source of fraud and forgery. Be skeptical of recently recorded Quit Claim Deeds and Special Warranty Deeds. Contact Underwriting if you see these red flags:

    • The Quit Claim Deed is not recorded in connection with a divorce, a foreclosure, or to clear a title defect
    • The Quit Claim Deed is handwritten
    • The Scrivener is not shown, or the Grantee is the Scrivener
    • The Quit Claim Deed is recorded several months after it is executed or acknowledged
    • The acknowledgment is incomplete
    • The appraiser’s website shows an out of state address for the Grantor, but the deed was acknowledged locally (and vice versa)
    • The Grantor’s address on Quit Claim Deed is out of state, but the deed was acknowledged locally (and vice versa)
    • Witness’s names are familiar (same as grantee, movie stars, cartoons)
    • The Grantee is a current tenant
    • The Notary’s stamp looks fishy, e.g., Commission Number has consecutive numbers “987654” or may be too long or short. (In Florida, for instance, the Commission Number is usually 6 digits).

    Go to Blog

  • What Makes Your Title Company Unique: Why You Should Care About Differentiation

    What Makes Your Title Company Unique: Why You Should Care About Differentiation

    Why you? What makes you special? What makes you different? What makes you better?

    When you speak or write about your title company do you bring up what is different and better and trigger immediate interest? Do you elaborate on what is new, unusual and of great value to your customers? Or do you speak and write about what is ordinary and common and trigger immediate indifference to your value?

    There are fundamental principles of economics at work here. The simplified explanation is that people assess value at the margins or edges of common offers. It’s called the Principle of Marginal Utility and Marginal Value.

    For example, when you see an ad for a new smartphone does the ad inform you that you can store telephone numbers and text and email people from it? Or does it focus on things that make the smartphone an extraordinary camera, with face ID, and with uncommon face recognition that allows you to mirror your expressions in 12 Animojis so you can reveal your inner panda, pig or robot?

    Whenever we as human beings are introduced to something NEW we are hardwired to make an assessment of its value. That’s what you want to do with your sales conversations and the content on your website and social media – provide compelling explanations about the extraordinary value of what you offer that your competitors do not offer.

    So are you speaking and writing about your differentiatiors and separating yourself from your competition or are you speaking and writing about what is common and ordinary and triggering people into an assessment that your company is ordinary and should be “priced” (low) to differentiate itself?

    When you are common you are priced. Margins are low. So you have to focus on VOLUME. When you are different and your customers value that difference, margins are higher. You can focus on VALUE instead of volume and think of ways to increase your customers’ willingness to pay a premium by inventing new ways to enhance the customer’s experience.

    Go to Blog

  • Is your Linkedin page open for business, and why does it matter?

    Is your Linkedin page open for business, and why does it matter?

    You do a good job of promoting your business, right? You have a website, place ads in publications that your target market is likely to read and you support your community through key sponsorships.

    You have a strong cadre of clients, influencers and prospects because you’re a great networker. So, why do you need to create and maintain a professional profile on LinkedIn?

    Is this social networking thing ever going to go away?

    It’s not going away, and LinkedIn is a fabulous tool for your business networking. If you utilize only one online network for your business, make it LinkedIn.

    But, why?

    LinkedIn is the largest professional network in the world, that’s why. Your network is using it, your competitors are using it, your prospective employees are using it, your local media is using it, and you better be using it, lest you fall behind.

    Here are the key steps to creating your LinkedIn presence:

    • Create a strong profile. Tap into your marketing team’s writing skills to create a professional summary of your skills and description of your business. This is an opportunity to promote your business and establish yourself as a thought leader within your business. Use your resume to list your job history, education and highlight industry and community organizations in which you participate. Be prudent in listing any organizations that are personal.
    • Establish a presence. Once you’ve created a strong profile, begin building connections. Here’s a shortlist of people you need to invite to connect with you: coworkers, former coworkers, everyone in your network, former college friends (again, with prudence). Also, you’ll receive lots of invitations to connect with other professionals. Be sure to connect with them. Avoid “spammy” looking connection requests. They are not in your best interest.
    • Build and maintain relationships.
    • Scroll your LinkedIn news feed to stay abreast of your connections’ news. They’ll post when they change jobs, when they receive awards, have articles published, etc. Congratulate them. And, be sure to post your own news. This is an opportunity to grow relationships … relationships that may someday lead to new business.

    • Help others learn about you and your company. LinkedIn is a terrific recruiting and marketing tool. Encourage your teams to use it.

    One additional note: educate yourself on the various security features of your LinkedIn account to mitigate unwanted email, connection requests and various other barriers to your privacy.

    And, just like that, you’re a LinkedIn user.

    Go to Blog

  • Presidio Investors Partnership Will Help Us Provide More Solutions, Add More Value

    Presidio Investors Partnership Will Help Us Provide More Solutions, Add More Value

    Alliant National Title Insurance Company Announces Presidio Investors Partnership

    Underwriter will continue its “Agents First” experience, retain personnel and leadership

    LONGMONT, Colo. – The nation’s largest title insurance underwriter with no direct or affiliate operations today announced a plan for the company’s next stage of growth and a partnership with Presidio Investors, a private equity firm specializing in mid-market companies.

    Leadership and personnel at Alliant National will remain the same. The company will continue to deliver on its well-known “Agents First” service experience, which is what propelled Alliant National to become a Top 10 title insurance underwriter in only 12 years, according to financial stability rating firm Demotech.

    “Alliant National believes in the essential role independent agents play in protecting the property rights of our mutual customers,” said Robert Grubb, Alliant National CEO and president. “With the help of our trusted agents and our amazing team, we’ve built a thriving company aligned with the finest independent title insurance agents in the country.


    MEDIA INQUIRIES

    Cathie Beck
    Capital City Public Relations
    e : cathie@capitalcitypr.com
    p : 303-241-0805


    “We are excited to have a new partner whose culture is closely aligned with ours, one that can accelerate the plans we have determined are critical to strengthening and expanding our network of independent agents,” Grubb said.

    “This is an exciting opportunity for Alliant National and our agents,” said Kyle Rank, Alliant National executive vice president of agency. “The trust our agents have placed in us has allowed us to grow to this degree, and we now have a chance to deliver something really meaningful back to them. We’ll be able to provide more solutions, add more value – and provide additional resources that can help our agents excel in their businesses.”

    Alliant National is an industry pioneer that distinguishes itself from competitors by putting the interests of independent agents first. Bolstered by a unique alignment of interests with its agents, financial stability, strong underwriting capability and independent agents’ in-depth knowledge of local markets, the company has established a nationwide network with deep roots in local communities and a wealth of expertise that is flexible, personalized and continuously growing.

    “We are excited to partner with Bob and his team to help Alliant National during its next phase of development,” said Chris Puscasiu, managing partner of Presidio. “Throughout the entire process, we have been impressed by the company’s entrepreneurial culture and drive. We believe that Presidio’s experience and access to additional capital will help Alliant National accelerate its growth and continue to improve its already strong service offerings to its independent agent partners.”

    Presidio’s investment is pending approval from regulators and Alliant National’s current ownership group. Waller Helms Advisors served as the exclusive financial advisor, and Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck served as legal counsel to Alliant National in the transaction.

    Visit joinalliantnational.com/presidio for additional information.

    About Presidio Investors

    Presidio Investors was founded in 2007 with the goal of bringing large buyout expertise to entrepreneurially-led companies. Presidio invests in talented management teams to provide resources, including operational support and capital, for these entrepreneurs to succeed.

    About Alliant National

    Alliant National is an industry pioneer that distinguishes itself from competitors by putting the interests of Independent Agents first. Bolstered by financial stability, strong underwriting capability and Independent Agents’ in-depth knowledge of local markets, the company has established a nationwide network with deep roots in local communities and a wealth of expertise that is flexible, nuanced and continuously growing.

    Alliant National’s CEO, Bob Grubb, can be reached at 303.682.9800 x300 or bgrubb@alliantnational.com.

    Visit joinalliantnational.com for additional information.

    About Alliant National Title Insurance Company

    The Independent Underwriter for The Independent Agent® Alliant National believes in putting other people first. The company partners with 400+ trusted independent title agents as a licensed underwriter in 22 states, with annual revenues exceeding $120 million, and protects the dreams of property owners with secure title insurance.

    ###

    Go to Blog

  • How to harness influencer marketing techniques to grow your business

    How to harness influencer marketing techniques to grow your business

    Influencer marketing is a powerful tool for marketing and growing your business. If you aren’t already utilizing this method of marketing, you’re missing a big opportunity.

    And, hopefully you don’t have the mindset that, “I’ve done great so far without it, why start now when it may just be a fad?” Influencer marketing is here to stay!

    Influencer marketing has been here for centuries, but in other forms. Referrals and customer complaints are influencer marketing. The art of influence elicits changes in thinking or behavior.

    An influencer is someone who has the power to change our perception and behavior.

    Because social media is now mainstream, influencer marketing is everywhere. Customers don’t have to go looking for referrals. Referrals (and other influencing content) are everywhere.

    So, what’s the best way to use influencer marketing to grow your business?

    Here are several ways to increase influencer marketing within your business:

    • Know the influencers and build relationships with them. Influencers include “influential” people within your community, such as prominent bloggers and local non-competing business people. The influencer’s audience should be the same audience you are trying to reach.
    • Offer valuable information (contributed article, tips, etc.) to the influencers, asking them to consider sharing the content on their blogs or other social media. The key is to make it pertinent information for the influencer’s audience, and not “salesy” content.
    • Ask your satisfied customers (who, by the way, are influencers) to review your business on Yelp, Google and Facebook. They love you, so be sure they share their love for you. The goal is for prospective customers to see these reviews when they are researching and making purchase decisions.
    • Ask customers to “check-in” on Facebook when they visit your office. This is a great method for growing your business’s popularity on Facebook. Consider offering a small monthly prize ($25 gift card to local restaurant) via a random drawing from all people who’ve checked in over the past month.
    • Engage with your clients via social media. This is a great method of personalizing your service and further integrating into your community. Be cautious of sharing, liking or commenting on any potentially objectionable content. Keep it clean!

    One additional note: you should avoid paying influencers to market your product, as paid endorsements lose credibility with buyers.

    Follow these tips and you’ll be practicing influencer marketing! It’s not rocket science. It just takes a conscious effort, a plan and a common-sense approach.

    Go to Blog

  • Know This Real Estate Document Trio: The Deed, The Note + The Mortgage

    Know This Real Estate Document Trio: The Deed, The Note + The Mortgage

    Real estate professionals are expected to have a lot of information under their belts (and in their heads) to help their clients.

    There is there so much new information coming out all the time and keeping that all in our straight can be exhausting and confusing.

    Sometimes the things we know best get shoved into that corner of our brains where I’m sure all the unmatched socks go – which is why it is helpful to have a quick refresher on the things we talk to our clients about every day. (Because they often ask, and we don’t want to admit we’ve forgotten!)

    Three basic instruments are involved in most financed residential real estate transactions, and knowing which is which and how they relate to each will be very valuable knowledge to provide to your clients.

    The three documents are: The Deed, The Note and The Mortgage.

    The Deed

    Property deeds come in many forms, most of them you will recognize as the Quit Claim Deed, General Warranty Deed, Special Warranty Deed, and Certificate of Title. Quit Claim Deeds (often called a “QCD”) and Warranty Deeds are the most common types of deeding instruments to convey property from one party (the “Grantor”) to another (“the Grantee”).

    Special Warranty Deeds will come up frequently when a client is purchasing REO property and the deed is being conveyed by the bank that took the property during foreclosure, or the subsequent deed-holder, which could be a loan servicer or a government-backed entity like Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac/Ginnie Mae.

    Certificates of Title are only given by the Clerk at foreclosure sale, after a final judgment has been entered and a certificate of sale has been recorded.

    It is important to remember a few things about deeds:

    • The type of deed being given will dictate the type of ownership is being conveyed. General and Special Warranty Deeds convey greater promises to clear title than do Quit Claim Deeds; and Quit Claim Deeds provide greater promises to title than does a Certificate of Title.
    • Deeds are recordable instruments. When you are researching property for a potential client, you should always be able to find the “granting deed,” which is what conveyed title of the property from the previous owner as “Grantor” to the current owner and seller, the “Grantee.”
    • When Deeds are prepared, they need to be signed by the Grantor, the person giving away title. Although they do not need to be signed by the Grantee, the person receiving title must acknowledge the transfer.
    • Deeds do not need to be dated but they do need to be witnessed by two (2) people and notarized.
    • The Note

      The Note and Mortgage are like peanut butter and jelly. They need each other. Even though they do different things, they always stick together.

      When your buyer is approved for financing to purchase property, the two financing documents that are the most important to your client as well as to the bank are the Note and Mortgage.

      The Note is usually a long-form document, printed on legal-size paper and is typically two to three pages long, usually not more than five. The Note is the document that secures the debt owed against the individual who has taken the loan.

      It is essentially and otherwise called, the promissory Note – the promise to pay.

      The debtor, the person who now owes the debt, promises to pay the lender the amount owed on the Note, with interest, and specifies the amount of time the debtor has to pay the loan back.

      It is important to remember a few things about notes:

      • The Note is not a recorded instrument; therefore, you will not be able to find it on the clerk or property appraiser’s website.
      • The Note only obligates the people who are listed on the Note; it does not obligate property owners listed on the deed who are not listed on the Note.
      • Buyers and Sellers who are concerned about deficiency judgments (difference between amount bank accepts as judgment or short sale amount subtracted from total amount of debt owed on Note) should make sure that they are listed on the Note. If they are not, they are not responsible for the debt and therefore, a bank foreclosure will not affect their credit.
      • The Mortgage

        The Mortgage is the counterpart of the Note. The Mortgage is the security instrument which evidences the lien placed on the property to secure the debt.

        In other words, the Mortgage is attached to the property while the Note is attached to the person.

        Mortgages, as it should make sense, are recorded instruments, because they create a lien against the property. Mortgages are usually six to 10 pages in length but are often longer because they typically are accompanied by different riders and addenda, which make specific demands against the type of lien on the land.

        Buyers who are on the Mortgage or the Deed, are not necessarily also on the Note.

        People on the Mortgage are usually people who have a “property interest,” and are usually the same names that are listed on the Deed.

        Oftentimes however, in foreclosure cases, the person listed on the Mortgage is named in the complaint because they have an interest in the property and need to be put on notice of the pending court action. It does not necessarily mean that they will have a judgment entered against them that will affect their credit.

        To Recap:

        • The Deed is a recorded document memorializing the transfer of property from the Grantor to the Grantee.
        • The Note is an unrecorded paper that binds an individual who has assumed debt through a promise-to-pay instrument.
        • The Mortgage is a recorded document that secures the debt taken with a lien on real property as collateral for repayment on the Note.
        • Hopefully this article answers most of the common questions your clients will have about the relationship between three of the most important documents in a real estate transaction.

    Go to Blog

  • Taking a Customer-Centric Approach to Running Your Business

    Taking a Customer-Centric Approach to Running Your Business

    It’s more than just a buzzword or a banner on your office wall. How do you make your customers the center of your business operations, culture and reason for coming to work each day?

    How do you make it your sole focus to anticipate and take care of their needs? How do you create a base of loyal fans who refer you to everyone they know?

    Of course, you do need to display your customer-centric core values prominently on your walls and make those values part of your daily vernacular at work.

    You also need to immerse those values into your company culture every day. Make those values come to life in the eyes of all employees.

    One way to bring the values to life is by tying them to employee performance within your company. Options for marrying performance to a customer-centric value system include:

    • Creating a customer survey process and inviting customers to review employees based on a number of metrics (all tied to your customer-centric core values);
    • Create a “living the values” award and ask employees to vote for their peers;
    • Develop a “secret shopper” system to periodically test employee responses to typical customer requests;
    • Build the customer-centric core values into each employee’s annual review rating guide.
    • Another key means to bring those customer-centric values to life is to lead by example, such as:

      • Make the values at least a small portion of every single internal meeting in your company;
      • Follow the customer-centric approach you’ve created—for your external customers and internal customers (aka employees);
      • Make yourself available and approachable any time an employee has a question related to the core values;
      • Create a “daily devotional” core value email to hit employee inboxes at the start of each work day;
      • Communicate best-practice examples when you see other employees “living the values” during their daily jobs;
      • Offer constructive feedback when you see opportunities for employees to improve on their customer-centric approach.

      Additionally, research shows time and time again that employees stay in jobs where they feel connected, valued and engaged in meaningful work.

      Breathing life into customer-centric values, along with the tips offered above, offer employees that chance to feel like they belong. Research also shows that happy employees provide the very best customer service.

      So, remember that your customer-centric core values statements are just that—words—until you bring them to life with action.

    Go to Blog

  • Why You Shouldn’t Rely on Just any POA From the Internet for Your Closing

    Why You Shouldn’t Rely on Just any POA From the Internet for Your Closing

    Powers of Attorney (POAs) are legal documents that allow an individual, the “Grantor,” to nominate an agent, their “Attorney In Fact,” to sign and execute anything that the Grantor chooses, on their behalf, as though they were doing it themselves.

    This can include contracts, loans, deeds, stock purchase, applications for government services, sale of real property, medical forms and virtually anything else that can be contemplated.

    In real estate transactions, a Power of Attorney or POA is commonly seen when a party to the transaction such as the buyer or seller is either unavailable because they cannot attend the closing, or they are too ill or unable to physically sign the closing documents.

    Many states have laws which essentially require a POA to be accepted at face value, so long as there is no reason to suspect fraud or unlawful inducement in the use of the POA.

    Unfortunately, because a POA can provide an Attorney in Fact with near-limitless powers to act on behalf of another person, fraud is a very real risk that must be taken seriously.

    Therefore when a title underwriter or a loan officer is being asked to accept a POA, certain requirements and safeguards must be taken to ensure that the Grantor really intends for the Attorney in Fact to take the action that the document says they are permitted to do.

    Go to Blog

  • Examine These 5 Areas of Your Business to Deepen Your Business’s Narrative

    Examine These 5 Areas of Your Business to Deepen Your Business’s Narrative

    What’s the story of your title company’s value? What’s the story about who you are and what you stand for? What has your title agency accomplished? Why should you be trusted? Why should your prospects listen to you?

    What’s your story? And how do you deepen your story to make it more effective, strategic and competitive? Here are five essential things to look for to deepen your story and make it more compelling:

    Your Big Why

    Why does your title company exist? Why do you go to work every morning?

    Of course, we know you need to make a living, but going deeper than that, what drives you and your company? What is the purpose behind you and the company you lead?

    Look for a BIG why (not a small why), something like you believe that home is the most important place on earth or that you believe in homeownership as part of the American Dream.

    What you’re trying to do here is demonstrate your sincerity and passion for what you do – and motivate your employees and customers around a unifying cause.

    Your Title Company’s Achievements

    These have to be highly-valued to be effective. Giving to charity, being in business for 10 years, serving the community, and producing happy customers are not highly valued achievements.

    What have you done that is great? Unusual? Look for that.

    Your Title Company’s Principles

    What matters to you most? What values guide your company’s behaviors?

    Pick three and have some wonderful “specific” stories about how your team was influenced by your principles and acted in ways that really helped your clients get ahead.

    Your Value Story

    Why is your title agency more important, useful and worthwhile to use? What do you offer that other title companies do not? Remember that people assess value on the edges or margins of common offers.

    More convenient office locations? 24/7/365 closings anywhere, anytime? Best follow-up? Higher tech? CE classes for REALTORS? E-closings?

    Your Reason to Act Now

    What bad things could happen to the people who do not use your services? What risks are they taking? What compelling reasons can you give without speaking badly about a specific competitor? Learn to bring these forth.

    The competitive reality is that a title company needs to be in continual Story Deepening bringing forth the importance of their products and services, speaking their competitive advantages and superior value to customers and prospects. If you don’t, who will?

    Your company has an unlimited supply of stories to share. By incorporating a steady narrative based upon your company’s purpose and guiding principles, you can take advantage of strategic storytelling to gain a competitive edge.

    Go to Blog

KEEPING AN OUTWARD MINDSET

Whether employees or customers, we put people first and always strive to be helpful to others.
Discover ‘How’ We Work

GUIDED BY OUR 'TRUE NORTH'

It’s our job to support the vital role of independent title agents in the real estate transaction.
See ‘Why’ We Exist

A BUSINESS SOLUTIONS COMPANY

We solve problems in innovative ways so independent title agents can grow their businesses.
See ‘What’ We Offer

The Independent Underwriter for the Independent Agent®